Merindad

Merindad (Spanish pronunciation: [meɾinˈdað]) is a Mediaeval Spanish administrative term that refers to a country subdivision smaller than a province but larger than a municipality. The officer in charge of a merindad was called a merino, roughly equivalent to the English count or bailiff.
It was used in the kingdoms of Castile and Navarre. Connected to the birth of Castile, the Merindades, standing for a northernmost comarca of the province of Burgos, was part of the creation of the administrative division by King Pedro I.
Currently, the Foral Community of Navarre is still divided into five merindades standing for different judicial districts. The historic Merindad de Ultrapuertos lying to the north of the Pyrenees is nowadays Lower Navarre.
Administratively, they have been substituted by the partido judicial. In Biscay, the mancomunidades comarcales keep the place of the old merindades, such as Duranguesado.
See also[edit]

Partidos of Buenos Aires, a second-level administrative subdivision
Partidos of Chile in Colonial Chile, a second-level administrative subdivision

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Spanish terms for country subdivisions

National, Federal

Comunidad autónoma
Departamento
Distrito federal
Estado
Provincia
Región

Regional, Metropolitan

Cantón
Comarca
Comuna
Corregimiento
Delegación
Distrito
Mancomunidad
Merindad
Municipalidad
Municipio
Parroquia

Ecuador
Spain

Urban, Rural

Aldea
Alquería
Anteiglesia
Asentamiento

Asentamiento informal
Pueblos jóvenes

Barrio
Campamento
Caserío
Ciudad

Ciudad autónoma

Colonia
Lugar
Masía
Población
Ranchería
Sitio
Vereda
Villa
Village (Pueblito/Pueblo)

Historical subdivisions in italics.

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