Qasr al-Hayr al-Sharqi

Qasr al-Hayr al-Sharqi
قصر الحير الشرقي

The palace Qasr al-Hayr al-Sharqi

Location within Syria

General information

Country
Homs Governorate, Syria

Coordinates
35°04′26″N 39°04′16″E / 35.073889°N 39.071111°E / 35.073889; 39.071111

Qasr al-Hayr al-Sharqi (Eastern al-Hayr Palace or the “Eastern Castle”) is a castle (qasr) in the middle of the Syrian Desert. It was built by the Umayyad caliph Hisham ibn Abd al-Malik in 728-29 CE in an area rich in desert fauna.[1] It was apparently used as a military and hunting outpost.[2] The palace is the counterpart of Qasr al-Hayr al-Gharbi, a nearby castle palace built one year earlier.[1]

Contents

1 Location
2 Architecture
3 World Heritage Status
4 See also
5 Notes

Location[edit]
Qasr al-Hayr al-Sharq is 27 kilometres (17 mi) from Al-Sukhnah and 100 kilometres (62 mi) from Sergiopolis (Rusafa), near Bishri Mountain near Palmyran Middle Mountains.
Architecture[edit]
The palace consists of a large open courtyard surrounded by thick bulwarks and towers guarding the entrances as well as each corner.[3] The palace consists of two square structures, one with a diameter of 300m and the other of 100 metres (330 ft). The palace(s) contains remnants of rooms, arches and columns which seem to be parts of a huge royal complex. Some of the decorated parts have been moved to the National Museum of Damascus while the gate has been reconstructed in the Deir ez-Zor Museum.[4]
The bigger palace has been several floors, with a huge gate and many towers. Towers were not built as defensive measures. There were also olive yards. The palaces were supplied with water by nearby Byzantine church by a canal 5,700 metres (6,200 yd) long. The palaces contained bathrooms, water reservoirs, mosques and gardens.
World Heritage Status[edit]
This site was added to the UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List on June 8, 1999 in the Cultural category.[5]
See also[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Qasr al-Heir al-Sharqi.

Desert castles
List of castles in Syria

Notes[edit]

^ a b Constable, O.R. (2003). Housing the Stranger in the Mediterranean World: Lodging, Trade, and Travel in Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. p. 56. ISBN 0-521-81918-0. 
^ Un Château du désert: Qasr al-Hayr ach-Charqi – UNESCO World Heritage Centre Archived February 13, 2009, at the Wayback Machine..
^ Un Château du déser
걸천사

Tommy Lander

Tommy Lander

Personal information

Date of birth
1875

Place of birth
Burslem, England

Date of death
1956 (aged 80–81)

Playing position
Half-back

Youth career

Talke Alexandra

Senior career*

Years
Team
Apps
(Gls)

1897–1902
Burslem Port Vale
62
(2)

Total

62
(2)

* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.

Thomas “Tommy” J. Lander (1875 – 1956) was an English footballer who played for Burslem Port Vale at the turn of the 20th century.
Playing career[edit]
Lander joined Burslem Port Vale from Talke Alexandra in March 1897.[1] He played 16 Second Division games in the 1898–99, but only appeared eight times in the league during the 1899–1900 campaign.[1] He played 13 league and FA Cup matches in the 1900–01 season, and scored his first goal in the Football League on 1 December, in a 3–2 win over Barnsley at the Athletic Ground.[1] He claimed another goal on 29 December, in a 3–2 defeat to Birmingham City at Muntz Street.[1] He played 25 league games in the 1901–02 season, before being released at the end of the season.[1]
Statistics[edit]

Sourced from Tommy Lander profile at the English National Football Archive (subscription required)

Club
Season
Division
League
FA Cup
Other
Total

Apps
Goals
Apps
Goals
Apps
Goals
Apps
Goals

Burslem Port Vale
1896–97
Midland League
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
0

1897–98
Midland League
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

1898–99
Second Division
16
0
1
0
5
0
22
0

1899–1900
Second Division
8
0
2
0
2
0
12
0

1900–01
Second Division
12
2
1
0
0
0
13
2

1901–02
Second Division
25
0
1
0
1
0
27
0

Total
62
2
5
0
8
0
75
0

References[edit]

^ a b c d e Kent, Jeff (1996). Port Vale Personalities. Witan Books. p. 167. ISBN 0-9529152-0-0. 

춘자넷

William Martin (skeleton racer)

William L. Martin (born July 8, 1928) was an American skeleton racer who competed in the late 1940s. He finished fourth in the men’s skeleton event at the 1948 Winter Olympics in St. Moritz.
References[edit]

1948 men’s skeleton results
Wallechinsky, David (1984). “Skeleton (Cresta Run)”. In The Complete Book of the Olympics: 1896–1980. New York: Penguin Books. p. 577.
William Martin’s profile at Sports Reference.com

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야플티비

Narayan Pura

Narain Pura (Urdu: نراین پورہ ‎) is one of the neighbourhoods of Saddar Town in Karachi, Sindh, Pakistan.[1]
There are several ethnic groups including Muhajirs, Sindhis, Punjabis, Kashmiris, Seraikis, Pakhtuns, Balochis, Memons, Bohras, Ismailis, etc. Over 75% of the population is Muslim. The town also has significant population of low caste Hindus.
References[edit]

^ Saddar Town Page

External links[edit]

CDGK sweepers to vacate 35-year-old rickety building in Narain Pura

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Neighbourhoods of Karachi

Baldia Town

Gulshan-e-Ghazi
Islam Nagar
Ittehad Town
Muhajir Camp
Muslim Mujahid Colony
Nai Abadi
Naval Colony
Rasheedabad
Saeedabad

Bin Qasim Town

Cattle Colony
Gaghar
Gulshan-e-Hadeed
Ibrahim Hyderi
Landhi Colony
Quaidabad
Rehri

Gadap Town

Darsano Chana
Gadap
Gujro
Manghopir
Maymarabad
Murad Memon Goth
Sohrab Goth
Songal
Yousuf Goth

Gulberg Town

Aisha Manzil
Ancholi
Azizabad
Karimabad
Naseerabad
Shafiq Mill Colony
Water Pump
Yaseenabad

Gulshan Town

Civic Centre
Delhi Mercantile Society
Eissa Nagri
Gillani railway station
Gulistan-e-Johar
Gulshan-e-Iqbal I
Gulshan-e-Iqbal II
Gulzar-e-Hijri
Jamali Colony
Metroville Colony
Pehlwan Goth
P.I.B. Colony
Safooran Goth
Shanti Nagar

Jamshed Town

Akhtar Colony
Azam Basti
Central Jacob Lines
Chanesar Goth
Garden East
Jamshed Quarters
Jut Line
Mahmudabad
Manzoor Colony
Pakistan Quarters
P.E.C.H.S.
P.E.C.H.S. II
Soldier Bazar

Keamari Town

Baba Bhit
Bhutta Village
Gabo Pat
Kakapir
Keamari
Machar Colony
Maripur
Salehabad
Shams Pir
Shershah
Sultanabad

Korangi Town

Bilal Colony
Chakra Goth
Gulzar Colony
Hasrat Mohani Colony
Hundred Quarters
Korangi Sector 33
Mustafa Taj Colony
Nasir Colony
Zaman Town

Landhi Town

Awami Colony
Bhutto Nagar
Burmee Colony
Dawood Chowrangi
Khawaja Ajmeer Colony
Korangi
Landhi
Moinabad
Muslimabad
Muzafarabad
Sharafi Goth
Sherabad

Liaquatabad Town

Abbasi Shaheed
Bandhani Colony
Commercial area
Dak Khana
Firdous Colony
Mujahid Colony
Nazimabad
Qasimabad
Rizvia Society
Sharifabad
Super Market

Lyari Town

Agra Taj Colony
Allama Iqbal Colony
Baghdadi
Bihar Colony
Chakiwara
Daryaabad
Nawabad
Ragiwara
Shah Baig Line
Singo Line

Malir Town

Gharibabad
Ghazi Brohi Goth
Jafar-e-Tayyar
Kala Board
Khokhra Par
Model Colony
Saudabad
Usmanabad
Bahria Town Karachi

New Karachi Town

Abu Zar Ghaffari
Faisal Colony
Fatima Jinnah Colony
Godhra
Gulshan-e-Sa
야동

Juancho E. Yrausquin Airport

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Juancho E. Yrausquin Airport

IATA: SAB
ICAO: TNCS

Summary

Airport type
Public

Operator
Winair

Serves
Saba

Location
Saba

Elevation AMSL
60 ft / 18 m

Coordinates
17°38′44″N 063°13′14″W / 17.64556°N 63.22056°W / 17.64556; -63.22056Coordinates: 17°38′44″N 063°13′14″W / 17.64556°N 63.22056°W / 17.64556; -63.22056

Map

TNCS

Location in Saba

Runways

Direction
Length
Surface

m
ft

12/30
400
1,312
Paved

Juancho E. Yrausquin Airport (IATA: SAB, ICAO: TNCS) is an airport on the Dutch Caribbean island of Saba.[1]

Contents

1 Overview
2 Facilities
3 Airlines and destinations
4 See also
5 References
6 External links

Overview[edit]
The airport, named after the Aruban Minister Juancho Irausquin, has one of the shortest commercial runways in the world, only 400 metres (1,312 ft) long, flanked on one side by high hills, with cliffs that drop into the sea at both ends.[1][2] Although the airport is closed to jet traffic, regional airline propeller aircraft are able to land there under waivers from The Netherlands Antilles’ Civil Aviation Authority. The most common aircraft to land there are the Twin Otter and BN-2 Islander.[citation needed]
Facilities[edit]
Jet aircraft are unable to land at the airport, because the runway is too short,[3] but smaller STOL[1] airplanes (such as the DHC-6, BN-2, and helicopters) are common sights there. A small ramp and terminal are on the southwest flank of the runway. The ramp also has a designated helipad. The terminal building houses offices for Winair, immigration and security, a fire department with one fire truck, and a tower.[4] The tower is an advisory service only and does not provide air traffic control. Aviation fuel is not available on the island of Saba.[citation needed]
Airlines and destinations[edit]
The only airline currently providing scheduled services to and from Yrausquin Airport is locally owned Winair, which operates daily flights to Sint Maarten aboard a de Havilland Canada DHC-6 Twin Otter.[5] On average, flights to Saint Maarten last no longer than 15 minutes.[6]

Airlines
Destinations

Anguilla Air Services[7]
Charter: Anguilla

Win
몰카

Ministry of Infrastructure (Rwanda)

The Ministry of Infrastructure (MININFRA; Kinyarwanda: Ministeri y’Ibikorwaremezo; French: Ministère des Infrastructures) is a department of the Government of Rwanda. The Ministry is responsible for infrastructure policy and development throughout the country. The current Minister is Albert Nsengiyumva, who took office in 2011.

Contents

1 History
2 Duties and responsibilities
3 References
4 External links

History[edit]
The ministry was founded after Rwandan independence in 1962 as the Ministry for Technical Businesses.[1] Three years later it was renamed to the Ministry of Public services. Following the military coup which brought President Juvenal Habyarimana to power, the ministry was renamed again to the Ministry of Public Services and Energy. It retained this name until 1980, when it was expanded to include a water remit.[1] The Ministry of Public Services was retained after the 1994 Rwandan Genocide, reverting first to its former title of Ministry of Public Services and Energy, from 1994 then back to its 1960s title of Ministry of Public Services (MINITRAP) in 1997 and to the new name of Ministry of Public Services, Transport and Communication in 1999. The Ministry gained its current name Ministry of Infrastructure in 2002.[1]
The Ministry is headed by the Minister of Infrastructure. Since it gained its current incarnation, Ministers have included:

Jean Damascene Ntawukuriryayo, from 2002 to 2004,[2]
Evariste Bizimana, from 2004[3] to 2006
Stanislas Kamanzi, from 2006[4] to 2008
Linda Bihire, from 2008[5] to 2009
Vincent Karega, from 2009[6] to 2011
Albert Nsengiyumva, from 2011 to present.[7]

Duties and responsibilities[edit]
The Ministry’s mission statement, as stated on its website, is “to ensure the sustainable development of infrastructure and contribute to economic growth with a view to enhancing the quality of life of the population.”[8] Its remit includes overseeing maintenance and development of infrastructure in Rwanda including transport, energy, habitat and urbanism, meteorology, and water and sanitation.[8]
References[edit]

^ a b c Ministry of Infrastructure, Republic of Rwanda. “History of the Ministry of Infrastructure (MININFRA)”. 
^ http://rwandarwacu.wordpress.com/election-2010/dr-jean-damascene-ntawukuriryayo/
^ Article: Minor cabinet reshuffle in Rwanda
^ http://dsds.teriin.org/2010/bio2010/Stanislas_kamanzi.pdf
^ http://www.newtimes.co.rw/news/index.php?i=13464&a=960&icon=Results&id=2
^ Rwanda: New Mi
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Jakob Vogt

Jakob Vogt

Personal information

Born
(1902-09-04)4 September 1902
Ochtendung, Germany

Died
1 January 1985(1985-01-01) (aged 82)
Mayen

Sport

Country
 Germany

Sport
Weightlifting

Weight class
Light-Heavyweight

Club
AC Siegfried Ochtendung

Updated on 12 December 2016.

Jakob Vogt (4 September 1902 – 1 January 1985) was a German male weightlifter, who competed in the Light-Heavyweight category and represented Germany at international competitions. He won the silver medal at the 1911 World Weightlifting Championships and the gold medal at the 1924 European Championships in the middleweight class. He competed at the 1928 Summer Olympics.[1] During his career he set a total of eleven world records in the light-heavyweight category between 1926 and 1932; five in the press, one in the snatch, and five in the total.
References[edit]

^ “Profile of Jakob Vogt”. Sports Reference. Retrieved 9 December 2016. 

This biographical article relating to weightlifting in Germany is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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이브넷

Cannomois

Cannomois

Scientific classification

Kingdom:
Plantae

(unranked):
Angiosperms

(unranked):
Monocots

(unranked):
Commelinids

Order:
Poales

Family:
Restionaceae

Genus:
Cannomois
P.Beauv. ex Desv.

Type species

Cannomois cephalotes
Desv.[1]

Synonyms[2]

Cucullifera Nees
Mesanthus Nees

Cannomois is a group of plants in the Restionaceae described as a genus in 1828.[1][3] The entire genus is endemic to Cape Province in South Africa.[2]

Species[2]

Cannomois anfracta H.P.Linder
Cannomois arenicola H.P.Linder
Cannomois aristata Mast.
Cannomois congesta Mast.
Cannomois grandis H.P.Linder
Cannomois nitida (Nees ex Mast.) Pillans
Cannomois parviflora (Thunb.) Pillans
Cannomois primosii (Pillans) H.P.Linder
Cannomois robusta (Kunth) H.P.Linder
Cannomois scirpoides (Kunth) Mast.
Cannomois taylorii H.P.Linder
Cannomois virgata (Rottb.) Steud.

References[edit]

^ a b Tropicos, Cannomois P. Beauv. ex Desv.
^ a b c Kew World Checklist of Selected Plant Families
^ Desvaux, Nicaise Augustin. 1828. Annales des Sciences Naturelles (Paris) 13: 43-44 descriptions in Latin, commentary in French

This Poales-related article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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은꼴

Tetlin

Tetlin may refer to:

Tetlin, Alaska
Tetlin Lake
Tetlin River
Tetlin National Wildlife Refuge

This disambiguation page lists articles about distinct geographical locations with the same name.
If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended article.

일본야동

Tufts Historical Review

This article relies largely or entirely upon a single source. Relevant discussion may be found on the talk page. Please help improve this article by introducing citations to additional sources. (January 2017)

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Find sources: ”Tufts Historical Review” – news · newspapers · books · scholar · JSTOR · free images (November 2013) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

Tufts Historical Review  

Abbreviated title (ISO 4)

Tufts Hist. Rev.

Discipline
History of the United States

Language
English

Edited by
Brian Pollock, Jordan Rosenthal-Kay

Publication details

Publisher

Puritan Press (United States)

Publication history

2007-present

Frequency
Annual

Indexing

ISSN
1945-8681

LCCN
2008213764

OCLC no.
706049038

Links

Journal homepage

The Tufts Historical Review is an undergraduate and graduate peer-reviewed academic journal covering the history of the United States. It was established in 2007 as the academic publication of the Tufts History Society and the Department of History. The journal also organizes an annual endowed lecture series that brings notable historians to the university. The editorial board consists of undergraduate and graduate candidates at Tufts, with editors-at-large at Princeton University, New York University School of Law, and the University of Kansas. The journal is published by Puritan Press.
Annual lectures[edit]

2016: Dr. Erik Goldstein (Boston University): Shadows of Empire: The Legacy of British Imperial Ambitions in the Greater Middle East
2015: Dr. Tara Nummedal (Brown University): Fluid Matters: Blood, Corruption, & Generation in Early Modern Alchemy
2014: Lincoln Paine: Faith Follows the Flag: A Lecture
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